Sloths aren't the picky eaters we thought they were

Popular Science | 1/17/2019 | Staff
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This open structure is important when it comes to mating. Sloths are solitary creatures with extremely poor vision and, when the time is right, they need to find a mate from a widely dispersed population. Since the males are not equipped to go rushing around the forest looking for a receptive female, it is vital that they are able to be seen and heard when communicating their intentions to the local females. The relatively sparse foliage of Cecropia species is ideal for this, allowing the mating calls of the lonely males to travel much further than in the denser canopy of other trees.

The authors of this paper suggest that, when necessary, three-toed sloths are able to live in habitats that are less high quality than virgin forest. Young sloths and nursing mothers may use tree species that are less nutritious than...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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