Brain stimulation could let some blind people ‘see’ shapes made of light

Science | AAAS | 11/16/2018 | Staff
Click For Photo: https://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/styles/article_main_large/public/light_16x9.jpg?itok=AGRYN4o-

Patient BAA, who is 35, lost her sight when she was 27. She can still detect light and dark, but for all intents and purposes, she is blind. Now she—and other formerly sighted people—may one day regain a limited form of vision using electrodes implanted in the brain. In a new study, such electrodes caused parts of BAA’s and other people’s visual cortexes to light up in specific patterns, allowing them to see shapes of letters in their mind’s eyes.

The work is a step forward in a field that emerged more than 40 years ago but has made relatively little progress. The findings suggest that technical ways to stimulate images in the brain “are now within reach,” says Pieter Roelfsema, a neuroscientist who directs the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience in Amsterdam and wasn’t involved in the work.

Research - People - Brains - Shapes - 1970s

Research to electrically spur blind people’s brains to see shapes began in the 1970s, when biomedical researcher William Dobelle, then at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, first implanted electrodes in the brain to stimulate the visual cortex. Typically, the rods and cones in retinas translate light waves into neural impulses that travel to the brain. Specialized layers of cells there, known as the visual cortex, process that information for the rest of the brain to use.

Get more great content like this delivered right to you!

Click - Privacy - Policy

Click to view the privacy policy.

Dobelle’s implants took advantage of a phenomenon known as retinal mapping. The visual field—the plane of space you see when you look out into the world—roughly maps onto a segment of the visual cortex. By electrically stimulating parts of this brain map, Dobelle could cause flashes of light called phosphenes to appear in the minds of people who were blind, but who had experienced at least a few years of vision. By...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Science | AAAS
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sometimes I Wake Up Grumpy. Other Times I Let Her Sleep
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!