Tiny pacemakers aim to make infant heart surgeries less invasive, while cutting operating costs and time

ScienceDaily | 11/9/2018 | Staff
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Kumthekar, a Cardiovascular Disease in the Young Travel Award recipient, will deliver his oral abstract, entitled "Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Epicardial Placement of a Custom Miniature Pacemaker with Leadlet under Direct Visualization," in S101A as part of the Top Translational Science Abstracts in Pediatric Cardiology session.

"As cardiologists and pediatric surgeons, our goal is to put a child's health and comfort first," says Kumthekar. "Advancements in surgical fields are tending toward procedures that are less and less invasive. There are many laparoscopic surgeries in adults and children that used to be open surgeries, such as appendix and gall bladder removals. However, placing pacemaker leads on infants' hearts has always been an open surgery. We are trying to bring those surgical advances into our field of pediatric cardiology to benefit our patients."

Surgery - Standard - Pacemakers - Children - Doctors

Instead of using open-chest surgery, the current standard for implanting pacemakers in children, doctors could implant the tiny pacemakers by making a relatively tiny 1-cm incision just below the ribcage.

"The advantage is that the entire surgery is contained within a tiny 1-cm incision, which is what we find groundbreaking," says Kumthekar.

Help - Two-channel - Access - Port - Berul

With the help of a patented two-channel, self-anchoring access port previously developed by Berul' s research group, the operator can insert a camera into the chest to directly visualize the entire procedure. They can then insert a sheath (narrow tube) through the second channel to access the pericardial sac, the plastic-like cover around the heart. The leadlet, the short extension of the miniature pacemaker, can be affixed onto the surface of the heart under direct visualization. The final step is to insert the pacemaker into the incision and close the skin, leaving a tiny scar instead of two large suture lines.

The median time from incision to implantation in this thoracoscopic surgery study was 21 minutes, and the entire procedure took less than...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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