Scientists keep finding new ways energy drinks are terrible for you

Popular Science | 11/6/2018 | Staff
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Energy drinks aren’t technically a “food.” That’s not to trash them—it’s just a fact, and an important one at that.

The Food & Drug Administration regulates all products defined as food to ensure they’re safe for human consumption. Coffee drinks and soda, for instance, aren’t allowed to be too high in caffeine lest they cause heart problems. But energy drinks are classified as supplements, which means they’re unregulated—and manufacturers are free to shove as much caffeine inside a single can as they please. They can even mix caffeine with other stimulants in such a way that could cause cardiovascular or nervous system problems.

Physicians - Health - Effects - Cocktails - Study

That’s why physicians have been trying to investigate what the health effects of these caffeinated cocktails might be. A new study showing that a single drink can diminish blood vessel function is making headlines, but similar findings have been accruing for years now. The latest results are being presented at the annual American Heart Association Meeting. Back in 2015, Mayo Clinic researchers presented a study at the AHA’s Scientific Sessions demonstrating that a single beverage raised the drinker’s blood pressure and cortisol levels (a measure of stress).

A lot of the concern about these drinks comes from their high concentrations of stimulants. It’s entirely possible to overdose on caffeine alone (though it takes 5 to 10 grams of the stuff, which would be more coffee than your stomach could hold), and in combination with guarana, another stimulant, smaller amounts might have drastic effects.

Basics - World - Health - Organization - Meta-analysis

But it probably mostly comes down to the basics. The World Health Organization published a meta-analysis of energy drink studies that noted “the health risks associated with energy drink consumption are primarily related to their caffeine content.” Overdosing on caffeine doesn't necessarily result in death, but it can cause heart palpitations, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, metabolic acidosis, and hypertension....
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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