Checkmate: How plant protein Feronia protects against bacterial attackers

phys.org | 10/25/2018 | Staff
PaMe (Posted by) Level 3
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Plant scientists at Iowa State University have shed new light on a genetic pathway that influences both plant growth and disease resistance, making it a promising target for breeding new crop varieties that can fight pathogens without sacrificing performance.

The research, published this week in the peer-reviewed academic journal Current Biology, details how the protein Feronia works in the model plant Arabidopsis to promote growth and to confer disease resistance in the presence of bacterial pathogens.

Research - Feronia - Receptor - Kinase - Protein

The research focuses on Feronia, a receptor kinase protein found in plant cells that previous research has shown to have a hand in plant growth and stress response processes.

When plants are attacked by bacterial pathogens, a substance called coronatine, produced in the pathogens, utilizes the jasmonic acid system inside the plant cells to suppress the plant's disease response.

Coronatine - Plant - Plant - Defense - System

"The pathogen-produced coronatine tells the plant to disarm the plant's defense system," said Hongqing Guo, an assistant scientist in genetics, development and cell biology, and first author of the study. "That makes the plant more susceptible to disease."

But the ISU research shows Feronia can detect the pathogen's...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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