The Facebook hack affecting 50 million people also let the attackers access users' Tinder, Spotify, and Instagram accounts

Business Insider | 9/28/2018 | Rob Price
Mireille (Posted by) Level 3
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Facebook got hacked, it revealed on Friday — and 50 million users' accounts were compromised.

What's more, if the victims logged into other services — like Tinder, Instagram, or Spotify — with their Facebook accounts, those might be affected to.

Attackers - Possibility - Companies - Facebook - Login

It's not clear whether the attackers did this, but the possibility may force companies that rely on Facebook's login system to launch their own investigations.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was among the 50 million affected users.

Life - People - Hack - Facebook

Life just got worse for the 50 million people caught up in what may be the biggest hack of Facebook ever.

On Friday, the Silicon Valley tech firm revealed that it had detected a security breach in which an as-yet unknown attacker, or attackers, managed to gain access to tens of millions of users' accounts by exploiting vulnerabilities in its software.

Conference - Call - Reporters - Friday - Facebook

But it wasn't until a second, follow-up conference call with reporters on Friday that Facebook acknowledged one of the most alarming parts of the incident: Not only did the hackers obtain the ability to access the Facebook accounts of the affected users, they also had access to any other service in which a person used their Facebook account to register — including apps like Tinder, Spotify, and Airbnb.

Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, may also have been affected.

Revelation - Impact - Hack - People - Data

The revelation drastically widens the potential impact of the hack, putting people's private data elsewhere across the web at risk. It may force the numerous major companies and startups reliant on Facebook's login service to audit their own systems for evidence of malicious activity as a result.

Tinder, Airbnb, and Spotify — perhaps three of the highest-profile tech companies to use Facebook's login service — did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

Attackers - Way - Facebook - Access - Tokens

So what happened? In short, the attackers found a way to trick Facebook into issuing them "access tokens" —...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Business Insider
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