Otago-led research set to make smartphones even smarter

phys.org | 8/31/2018 | Staff
ajoy26 (Posted by) Level 3
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The accuracy of the global positioning system (GPS) in smartphones has been significantly improved thanks to research conducted at the University of Otago, New Zealand, in collaboration with Curtin University, Australia.

Have you ever noticed that the GPS location on your smartphone isn't all that smart? For example, your smartphone claims you are in the duck pond when in fact you are on the other side of the park and can't even see the duck pond? This new research conducted at the University of Otago, and recently published in the international Journal of Geodesy, is about to change that.

Signals - Global - Navigation - Satellite - Systems

By combining signals from four different Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs), Otago's Dr. Robert Odolinski and Curtin University colleague Prof Peter Teunissen, have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve centimeter(cm)-level precise positioning on a smartphone.

"It's all down to the mathematics we applied to make the most of the relatively low-cost technology smartphones use to receive GNSS signals, combining data from American, Chinese, Japanese, and European GNSS. We believe this new capability will revolutionize applications that require cm-level positioning," Dr. Odolinski says.

Technology - Look - Context

He says to understand the new technology, a look back at the historical scientific context is needed.

"For decades, construction, engineering, cadastral surveying and earthquake monitoring have relied on high-cost, 'dual-frequency', GPS positioning to obtain centimetre-level location information. The challenge is that GPS signals, travelling from Earth-orbiting...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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