Here's what the U.S. Army's new gender neutral fitness test will look like?

Popular Science | 7/23/2018 | Staff
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For the past 38 years, the United States Army has tested soldiers on three main physical fitness events: push ups, sit ups, and a two-mile run. You had to get a minimum score of 60 per event to pass (you can fail and stay in the Army, but you have to repeat the test and you can’t fail twice in a row). They’ve revised the precise numbers over the years there’s always been a difference in how much women were expected to do compared to the men.

Take push ups, for example. To score a 60 on the APFT as a 25-year-old woman (the points also vary by age), you have to do 17 push ups. A man of the same age has to do 40. Even a 55-year-old man would have to do three more push ups than that young woman to pass his physical test. The differences stand in the other events as well. Comparing 25-year-olds of different genders, men have to run two miles in about three fewer minutes, though both men and women need to perform 50 sit ups.

October - Years - Day - APFT - Effect

But as of October 2018, precisely 38 years to the day that the current APFT went into effect, all soldiers will perform exactly the same test. Why? Because it actually measures a soldier’s capabilities.

“If you ask, ‘why did you change the test now if you’ve had it and it’s been working?’ the answer is ‘because it’s 38 years old,” says Michael McGurk, the director of research and analysis at the U.S....
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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