Computer analytics finds a way to astronaut's hearts

phys.org | 3/12/2018 | Staff
shankay (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://cf3e497594.site.internapcdn.net/tmpl/v5/img/phys_308px.png

Keeping an eye on your health is extra important if you're 54 million kilometres from a hospital.

A computer analytics platform designed to keep an eye on the health of newborn babies is on its way into space.

Artemis - Platform - Goddess - Hospitals - Stress

Called Artemis, the platform is named after the Greek goddess of childbearing. It's used in hospitals to check the physical stress of babies adapting to life outside the womb.

Now it's using similar methods to monitor how astronauts adapt to zero gravity.

Astronauts - Health - Stats - Heart - Rate

Astronauts' health has always been tracked, but stats like heart rate and temperature were once recorded manually. Artemis collects, analyses and stores this information in a continuous stream of big data.

What happens to our hearts in space?

Dr - Carolyn - McGregor - University - Ontario

Dr. Carolyn McGregor is from the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. She started developing the technology behind Artemis almost 20 years ago.

Working with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems, her research is now focusing on monitoring the health of astronauts on the International Space Station.

NASA - Technology - Mission - Mars

If all goes well, NASA will use the technology in its proposed 2030 Mission to Mars.

"One of the most important objectives of space medicine is estimating the risk of disease developing," Carolyn says.

Body - Environment

"We can do this by monitoring how the body adapts to its new environment."

Being in space isn't...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sorry Mr. Franklin, we couldn't keep it.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!