WSU Tri-Cities team researching use of fungi to restore native plant populations

phys.org | 5/14/2018 | Staff
kims (Posted by) Level 3
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Transplanting fungi to restore native plant populations in the Midwest and Northwest is the focus of efforts by a team of WSU Tri-Cities researchers.

Mycorrhizal fungi form a symbiotic relationship with many plant roots, which helps stabilize the soil, conserve water and provides a habitat for many birds and insects, said Tanya Cheeke, assistant professor of biology. Some native plant species are more dependent on mycorrhizal fungi than invasive plant species. So, when that fungi is disturbed, native plants may not be able to compete as well with invasive species, disrupting the natural ecosystem of the environment and inhibiting many natural processes, she said.

Way - Plant - Survival - Growth - Environments

"One way to improve native plant survival and growth in disturbed environments may be to inoculate seedlings with native soil microbes, which are then transplanted into a restoration site," Cheeke said. "We've been doing prairie restoration in Kansas for the past two years. Now, we're also doing something similar in the Palouse area in Washington."

Cheeke is working with a team of undergraduate and graduate students to complete the research. A group of her undergraduate students recently presented their project during the WSU Tri-Cities Undergraduate...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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