Is Church (Literally) Good for You?

Desiring God | 7/20/2018 | Rebecca McLaughlin
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“If one could conceive of a single elixir to improve the physical and mental health of millions of Americans — at no personal cost,” wrote Harvard professor Tyler VanderWeele and journalist John Siniff in a USA Today OpEd, “what value would our society place on it?”

The article goes on to summarize an extensive body of research showing that religious participation correlates with multiple measures of mental and physical health: those who attend services have lower rates of depression, are more optimistic, are less likely to commit suicide, and are 20% to 30% less likely to die over a fifteen-year period. Flip this data on its head, and declining church attendance in the US could be termed a public health crisis.

VanderWeele - Professor - Epidemiology - Harvard - School

VanderWeele is a professor of epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, who has devoted much of his career to research and analysis in this area. His in-depth assessment of decades of studies separates the wheat from the methodological chaff and paints a picture of substantial benefits from participating in religious services. While the effect is not exclusive to Christianity, most of the studies have been done on Christians attending church and show that weekly attendance or more yields the greatest benefits.

Reassuringly, one of the positive correlations is with lower likelihood of divorce (page 10). While people who check the box “Christian” on a census form may be no more likely to have stable marriages than those who don’t, regular church attendance does seem to make the marriage knot harder to untie.

Area - Correlation - Religiousness - Levels - Forgiveness

Another area of positive correlation is forgiveness. Religiousness is associated with higher levels of forgiveness, and higher levels of forgiveness correlate with less depression, less anxiety, less likelihood of nicotine addiction or substance abuse, and fewer self-reported health symptoms (page 14). The list goes on.

What should we make of this...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Desiring God
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