NORSK TITANIUM, PRATT & WHITNEY, 3D PRINTED INTEGRALLY BLADED ROTOR AND MORE AEROSPACE ANNOUNCEMENTS

3dprintingindustry.com | 7/19/2018 | Michael Petch
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Aerospace and additive manufacturing news from the Farnborough International Airshow continues with a batch of news from Norsk Titanium.

Norsk Titanium, an aerospace additive manufacturing company with headquarters in Norway, alongside a team of aerospace industry specialists, have collaborated to create and test the first additive manufactured integrally bladed rotor (IBR) used within turbine engines.

University - Notre - Dame - Turbomachinery - Laboratory

The University of Notre Dame Turbomachinery Laboratory (NDTL), Pratt & Whitney, an aerospace manufacturer based in Connecticut, and TURBOCAM International, a turbomachinery manufacturing company based in Barrington, New Hampshire, are included in the industry team.

“We are excited to collaborate on these manufacturing and testing efforts and applications for future engine development,” said Dave Carter, Senior Vice President, Engineering, at Pratt & Whitney.

Norsk - Titanium - Rapid - Plasma - Deposition

Norsk Titanium’s Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD), is an additive manufacturing process using wired metal feedstock and argon gas to efficiently produce structural titanium parts.

Following the success of the RPD in producing the first additive manufactured part for Spirit AeroSystems, this collaboration is exploring its applicability in turbomachinery applications.

Phase - TURBOCAM - International - Trials - RPD

Within the initial phase of testing, TURBOCAM International conducted machining trials on the RPD material, then engineers at Pratt & Whitney inspected the material to the same specification as forged turbomachinery components. John Bressoud, General Manager of TURBOCAM Manufacturing stated:

“WE WERE VERY PLEASED WITH THE PERFORMANCE OF THE RPD MATERIAL. WE FOUND NO EVIDENCE OF ALPHA CASE, AND THERE WERE NO RESIDUAL STRESS CONCENTRATIONS THAT WOULD CAUSE DISTORTIONS TYPICALLY FOUND IN ADDITIVE MATERIALS. THE MATERIAL WAS EVEN MORE STABLE THAN WHAT WE WOULD EXPECT IF WE WERE MACHINING A TITANIUM FORGING.”

Phase - IBR - Environment - Testing - NDTL

The next phase of testing will involve an additively manufactured IBR in an operational environment. This testing will be conducted using NDTL’s turbomachinery test facility.

The rapid plasma deposition process in action. Image via Norsk Titanium.

Goal - Collaboration - Cost - Time

The long-term goal of this collaboration is to develop cost and time...
(Excerpt) Read more at: 3dprintingindustry.com
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