UK's turbines producing 40% less electricity as winds 'disappear'

Mail Online | 6/6/2017 | Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline
chicana948 (Posted by) Level 3
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Britain's wind turbines have been at a standstill for the last six weeks.

The lack of wind is being caused by a large area of high pressure sitting over the UK, which is also responsible for making the summer one of the warmest on record, the Met Office confirmed to MailOnline.

Year - Amount - Electricity - Wind - Turbines

Compared to last year, the amount of electricity generated by wind turbines during the month of July has fallen by 40 per cent – despite of an increase in wind turbine infrastructure in the last 12 months.

'We've been typically doing between two to three gigawatts of wind [generation],' Rob Gross of Imperial College London, told New Scientist.

Time - Year

'At a windier time of the year we might be doing nine or ten.'

The lack of wind can be blamed on the jet stream, which has shifted further north, trapping a large pocket of high pressure above the UK.

Lid - Everything - Graheme - Madge - Spokesperson

'It's like a lid, it keeps everything still,' says Graheme Madge, a spokesperson for the Met Office.

'From the forecast looking out over the next couple of weeks, there doesn't seem to be any significant change on the way.'

National - Grid - Wind - Generation - Weeks

According to the National Grid, wind generation in the six weeks between June 3 and July 15 is around 30 per cent lower than the same period last year.

A drop-off like this in winter could be catastrophic should the UK become reliant on renewable energy sources.

Advances - Storage - Energy - Power - Process

While advances in the storage of energy has meant power can be kept for longer, the process is yet to be perfected.

Fortunately, a spokesperson for the National Grid said that the warm weather conditions has meant 'electricity demand is low'.

Dr - Gross - Imperial - College - London

According to Dr Gross of Imperial College London, the UK needs to be prepared for periods of low wind levels in the future and look to alternative methods to meet demand.

The British government...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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