Tree shrews can tolerate hot peppers: Mutation in pain receptor makes peppery plant palatable

phys.org | 7/12/2018 | Staff
jacensolo775 (Posted by) Level 3
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Almost all mammals avoid eating chili peppers and other "hot" foods, because of the pain they induce. But not the tree shrew, according to a study publishing July 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yalan Han of the Kunming Institute of Zoology in China, and colleagues. The researchers found that this close relative of primates is unaffected by the active ingredient in chili peppers due to a subtle mutation in the receptor that detects it. They speculate that this is an evolutionary adaptation to enable tree shrews to cope with a peppery plant that makes up part of their diet.

Capsaicinoids, including the capsaicin found in chili peppers, are chemicals that deter animals from eating them. They act by triggering the activation of TRPV1, an ion channel found on the surface of pain-sensitive cells in the tongue and elsewhere. TRPV1's normal job is to alert animal to the presence of harmful heat, which is why capsaicinoids induce a sharp burning sensation. While humans may develop a tolerance and even a liking for capsaicinoids, most animals avoid feeding on plants that contain them.

Authors - Chinese - Shrews - Tupaia - Chinensis

The authors observed that Chinese tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) actively fed on chili peppers, and, in contrast with mice, did not reduce their food intake as the concentration of capsaicin increased. They found...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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