Researchers couple artificial atom to acoustic resonator

phys.org | 7/11/2018 | Staff
chrismpotts (Posted by) Level 3
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Researchers from Russia and Britain have demonstrated an artificial quantum system in which a quantum bit interacts with an acoustic resonator in the quantum regime. This allows quantum optics principles to be applied in the study of acoustic waves and enables an alternative approach to quantum computer design based on acoustics. It could also make quantum computers more stable and compact. The paper reporting the results was published in Physical Review Letters.

"We are the first to demonstrate an interaction between a qubit and a surface acoustic wave resonator in the quantum regime. Previously, resonators of this kind were studied, but without a qubit. Likewise, qubits with surface acoustic waves were studied, but those were running waves, without a resonator. The quantum regime was demonstrated on bulk resonators, but this didn't go far, perhaps due to difficulties in fabrication. We used a planar structure fabricated with existing technologies," says Aleksey Bolgar, researcher at MIPT's Artificial Quantum Systems Lab, where the study was conducted.

Researchers - Interaction - Qubit - Transmon - Surface

The researchers studied the interaction of a superconducting qubit, a transmon, with surface acoustic waves in a resonator (figure 1). The transmon behaves as an artificial atom—that is, it has a number of energy levels (figure 2) and undergoes transitions between them. The conventional microwave approach is to have one chip holding both the qubit and a microwave resonator supporting and amplifying the wave. In this setup, the qubit can interact with the resonator either by absorbing a photon from it and entering an excited state or by emitting a photon into it and returning to the ground state, provided that the photon frequency corresponds to the transition frequency of the qubit. The resonant frequency of the resonator itself varies depending on the state of the qubit. Therefore, by changing resonator characteristics, it is possible to read information from...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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