Cellular 'garbage disposal' has another job

phys.org | 7/10/2018 | Staff
iceyy (Posted by) Level 3
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Johns Hopkins researchers have found that the cellular "garbage disposal," known to scientists as proteasomes, may not only be responsible for the removal of cellular waste, but actually work on some of the most important proteins to neuronal development.

Building on a previous discovery, which found that specialized proteasomes in the membrane of brain cells have the potential to play a role in neuronal signaling, Seth Margolis, Ph.D., associate professor of biological chemistry and neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and his research team set out to find the specific proteins targeted by this specialized proteasome.

Study - July - Molecular - Cell - Researchers

In the new study, published July 5 in Molecular Cell, the researchers found that this membrane-bound proteasome only accepts specific proteins—a far cry from its original characterization as a catch-all trash disposal system.

In particular, they target a pool of proteins that are still in the process of being made, an important distinction from the full-length proteins that classic proteasomes target for degradation. Among these are Fos and Npas4, which are critical mediators...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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