Research shows how to improve the bond between implants and bone

phys.org | 7/4/2018 | Staff
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Research carried out recently at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Saskatoon has revealed promising information about how to build a better dental implant, one that integrates more readily with bone to reduce the risk of failure.

"There are millions of dental and orthopedic implants placed every year in North America and a certain number of them always fail, even in healthy people with healthy bone," said Kathryn Grandfield, assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at McMaster University in Hamilton.

Implant - Restores - Tooth - **** - Implant

A dental implant restores function after a tooth is lost or removed. It is usually a **** shaped implant that is placed in the jaw bone and acts as the tooth roots, while an artificial tooth is placed on top. The implant portion is the artificial root that holds an artificial tooth in place.

Grandfield led a study that showed altering the surface of a titanium implant improved its connection to the surrounding bone. It is a finding that may well be applicable to other kinds of metal implants, including engineered knees and hips, and even plates used to secure bone fractures.

People - North - America - Implants - Failure

About three million people in North America receive dental implants annually. While the failure rate is only one to two percent, "one or two percent of three million is a lot," she said. Orthopedic implants fail up to five per cent of the time within the first 10 years; the expected life of these devices is about 20 to 25 years, she added.

"What we're trying to discover is why they fail, and why the implants that are successful work. Our goal is to understand the bone-implant interface in order to improve the design of implants."

Grandfield - Research - Team - Fellow - Xiaoyue

Grandfield's research team, which included post-doctoral fellow Xiaoyue Wang and McMaster colleague Adam...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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