Computer graphics research team to present new tool for sketching faces

phys.org | 7/2/2018 | Staff
mel4 (Posted by) Level 4
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Across popular social media platforms, users are posting countless images every day. On Instagram alone, there are more than 40 billion uploaded photos—a figure that's skyrocketing by 95 million daily. This presents a clear need for intuitive yet robust photo-editing tools that allow the average user to perform advanced editing functions.

And while there is a definite need for interactive image editing with respect to social media, improved editing tools and systems also remain an important aspect of computer graphics and computer vision. However, there is a lack of tools that feature more complex editing functions for inexperienced users, such as changing the facial expression in a photo.

Research - Team - Computer - Scientists - University

A research team, led by computer scientists from the University of Bern-Switzerland and University of Maryland-College Park, have devised a sketch-based editing framework that enables a user to edit their photos by "sketching" a few strokes on top of them. Their system, called FaceShop, also offers a copy-paste function, which allows users to edit any part of a photo by copying-and-pasting the portion to be edited from another (better) photo, eliminating the need to hand-draw or sketch anything at all.

The team's approach is built on machine-learning techniques, which, in the end, give users more control over their desired edits in real-time and produce more realistic results.

Approaches - Techniques - Limitations - Instance - Systems

"Most other approaches rely on more traditional, handcrafted techniques, which impose some limitations. For instance, these systems are either [by design] restricted to limited sets of predefined editing operations, or they are very flexible but hard to use and require experienced users to spend a considerable amount of time to perform rather basic edits," says Tiziano Protenier, lead author of the work and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Bern. "In contrast, our system is very flexible and allows untrained users to perform complex edits within minutes using an...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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