Uncovering lost images from the 19th century

ScienceDaily | 6/22/2018 | Staff
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Research published today in Scientific Reports -- Nature includes two images from the National Gallery of Canada's photography research unit that show photographs that were taken, perhaps as early as 1850, but were no longer visible because of tarnish and other damage. The retrieved images, one of a woman and the other of a man, were beyond recognition.

"It's somewhat haunting because they are anonymous and yet it is striking at the same time," said Madalena Kozachuk, a PhD student in Western's Department of Chemistry and lead author of the scientific paper.

Image - Plate - Time - Kozachuk - Details

"The image is totally unexpected because you don't see it on the plate at all. It's hidden behind time," continues Kozachuk. "But then we see it and we can see such fine details: the eyes, the folds of the clothing, the detailed embroidered patterns of the table cloth."

The identities of the woman and the man are not known. It's possible that the plates were produced in the United States, but they could be from Europe.

Years - Kozachuk - Team - Scientists - Synchrotron

For the past three years, Kozachuk and an interdisciplinary team of scientists have been exploring how to use synchrotron technology to learn more about chemical changes that damage daguerreotypes.

Invented in 1839, daguerreotype images were created using a highly polished silver-coated copper plate that was sensitive to light when exposed to an iodine vapour. Subjects had to pose without moving for two to three minutes for the image to imprint on the plate, which was then developed as a photograph using a mercury vapour that was heated.

Kozachuk - Research - Light - Source - CLS

Kozachuk conducts much of her research at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) and previously published results in scientific journals in 2017 and earlier this year. In those articles, the team members identified the chemical composition of the tarnish and how it changed from one point to another on a daguerreotype.

"We compared...
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