Trademark holders must pay for UK web blocking orders – Supreme Court

www.theregister.co.uk | 6/13/2018 | Staff
ali11 (Posted by) Level 3
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BT has won a UK Supreme Court battle over who should pay the costs of trademark infringement blocking orders – and it won't be internet service providers.

Instead rights-holders must reimburse ISPs for the costs of blocking rights-infringing material, according to Supreme Court judge Lord Sumption.

Basis - Party - Burden - Injustice - Responsibility

"There is no legal basis for requiring a party to shoulder the burden of remedying an injustice if he has no legal responsibility for the infringement and is not a volunteer but is acting under the compulsion of an order of the court," ruled the judge, who sat as part of a five-strong panel at the highest court in the land.

"It follows that in principle the rights-holders should indemnify the ISPs against their compliance costs," he continued. Section 97A of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 allows rights-holders to go to court and get a blocking order – the question in the current case is who stumps up for the costs of complying with that order?

BT - EE - Finding - Court - Appeal

BT and co-appellant EE were arguing against an earlier finding by the Court of Appeal, which held in 2016 that ISPs should pick up the costs – in this case, to block sites peddling knock-off luxury Cartier watches and Montblanc jewellery.

Sweeping aside various legal precedents founded on EU law, Lord Sumption ruled: "In English law, the starting point is the intermediary's legal innocence. An ISP would not incur liability for trademark infringement under English law, even in the absence of the safe harbour provisions of the [EU] E-Commerce Directive... an ISP serving as a 'mere conduit' has no means of knowing what use is being made of his network by third parties to distribute illegal content.

Protection - Property - Rights - Cost - Business

"The protection of intellectual property rights is ordinarily and naturally a cost of the business which owns those rights and has the relevant interest in...
(Excerpt) Read more at: www.theregister.co.uk
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