New bolometer is faster, simpler, and covers more wavelengths

phys.org | 6/11/2018 | Staff
abbycraig (Posted by) Level 3
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Bolometers, devices that monitor electromagnetic radiation through heating of an absorbing material, are used by astronomers and homeowners alike. But most such devices have limited bandwidth and must be operated at ultralow temperatures. Now, researchers say they've found a ultrafast yet highly sensitive alternative that can work at room temperature—and may be much less expensive.

The findings, published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, could help pave the way toward new kinds of astronomical observatories for long-wavelength emissions, new heat sensors for buildings, and even new kinds of quantum sensing and information processing devices, the multidisciplinary research team says. The group includes recent MIT postdoc Dmitri Efetov, Professor Dirk Englund of MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kin Chung Fong of Raytheon BBN Technologies, and colleagues from MIT and Columbia University.

Work - Door - Types - Efficient - Bolometers

"We believe that our work opens the door to new types of efficient bolometers based on low-dimensional materials," says Englund, the paper's senior author. He says the new system, based on the heating of electrons in a small piece of a two-dimensional form of carbon called graphene, for the first time combines both high sensitivity and high bandwidth—orders of magnitude greater than that of conventional bolometers—in a single device.

"The new device is very sensitive, and at the same time ultrafast," having the potential to take readings in just picoseconds (trillionths of a second), says Efetov, now a professor at ICFO, the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain, who is the paper's lead author. "This combination of properties is unique," he says.

System - Temperature - Devices - Temperatures - Applications

The new system also can operate at any temperature, he says, unlike current devices that have to be cooled to extremely low temperatures. Although most actual applications of the device would still be done under these ultracold conditions, for some applications, such as thermal sensors for building efficiency,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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