Trees at nighttime trigger formation of charged particles

phys.org | 6/7/2018 | Staff
pixielilia (Posted by) Level 4
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Understanding how climate has changed over the last centuries and will evolve in the future requires a detailed knowledge of all the climate system components, including an accurate evaluation of the effect of human activity on those.

The presence of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is known to affect the climate, as, besides their interaction with solar radiation, they can also serve as seeds for the formation of cloud droplets. The formation of cluster particles from gaseous precursors and their subsequent growth has been reported to be a major source of particles; however, the identification of the mechanisms or the vapours involved is still not complete.

Order - Effect - Activity - Climate - Climate

"Also, in order to assess the effect of human activity on climate, it is necessary to compare present climate with that of the preindustrial era, which means we need an accurate representation of the preindustrial conditions, including aerosol particles and their sources," Clémence Rose, the principal writer of an article on observations of biogenic ion-induced cluster formation in the atmospher recently published says.

Sulfuric acid, the production of which is to a large extent related to anthropogenic activities, has been commonly accepted to be essential in the initial steps of new particle formation.

Ability - Vapours - Trees - Vapours - Particles

However, the ability of organic vapours emitted by trees, biogenic vapours, to also form particles was recently evidenced during experiments conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN. These findings suggest that such process might have dominated new particle formation in the preindustrial era, when sulfuric acid concentrations where much lower.

"While chamber experiments allow for detailed investigations of individual mechanisms and can also well mimic atmospheric observations, they cannot fully reproduce the complexity of the real atmosphere", Clémence Rose says.

Observations

Following the aforementioned observations at...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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