Are there enough chemicals on icy worlds to support life?

phys.org | 6/7/2018 | Staff
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/2018/arethereenou.jpg

For decades, scientists have believed that there could be life beneath the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. Since that time, multiple lines of evidence have emerged that suggest that it is not alone. Indeed, within the Solar System, there are many "ocean worlds" that could potentially host life, including Ceres, Ganymede, Enceladus, Titan, Dione, Triton, and maybe even Pluto.

But what if the elements for life as we know it are not abundant enough on these worlds? In a new study, two researchers from the Harvard Smithsonian Center of Astrophysics (CfA) sought to determine if there could in fact be a scarcity of bioessential elements on ocean worlds. Their conclusions could have wide-ranging implications for the existence of life in the Solar System and beyond, not to mention our ability to study it.

Study - Life - Subsurface - Ocean - Worlds

The study, titled "Is extraterrestrial life suppressed on subsurface ocean worlds due to the paucity of bioessential elements?" recently appeared online. The study was led by Manasavi Lingam, a postdoc student at the Institute for Theory and Computation (ITC) at Harvard University and the CfA, with the support of Abraham Loeb – the director of the ITC and the Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of Science at Harvard.

In previous studies, questions on the habitability of moons and other planets have tended to focus on the existence of water. This has been true when it comes to the study of planets and moons within the Solar System, and especially true when it comes the study of extra-solar planets. When they have found new exoplanets, astronomers have paid close attention to whether or not the planet in question orbits within its star's habitable zone.

Planet - Water - Surface - Addition - Astronomers

This is key to determining whether or not the planet can support liquid water on its surface. In addition, astronomers have attempted to obtain spectra from around...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Democrate or Republican, the difference is less than the thickness of a cigarette paper, or a slice of pastrami at a delicatesean.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!