Continental shelf shape leads to long-lasting tsunami edge waves during Mexican earthquake

phys.org | 5/17/2018 | Staff
Click For Photo: https://cf3e497594.site.internapcdn.net/tmpl/v5/img/phys_308px.png

The shape of the continental shelf off the southern Mexican coast played a role in the formation of long-lasting tsunami edge waves that appeared after last September's magnitude 8.2 earthquake, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2018 Annual Meeting.

Edge waves are coastal waves generated by a larger tsunami wave. They travel back and forth parallel to a shoreline. They can be an important part of overall tsunami hazard, depending on how big the edge waves are and how long they last, said University of Oregon researcher Diego Melgar.

Problem - Worse - Tsunami - Wave - Earthquake

"They make a bad problem worse," he said. "When a tsunami happens, you get one big wave because of the earthquake, but then if this edge wave problem is present, you're going to get large waves that follow it ... it's like sloshing in a kiddie pool."

During the September Tehuantepec earthquake, said Melgar, high amplitude edge waves lasted for an unusually long time, around 48 hours.

Waves

"These edge waves...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
The beatings will continue until moral improves.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!