Many accept their fate at the hands of Pele

Honolulu Star-Advertiser | 5/13/2018 | Staff
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A portrait of Pelehonuamea by artist, historian and author Herb Kane is displayed inside the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum.

Merrie - Monarch - Festival - Competition - Hilo

Before the annual Merrie Monarch Festival competition in Hilo, many halau visit Halemaumau crater to honor Pele. At left, members of Halau Ka Liko Pua O Kalaniakea throw lei and ti leaves into the crater after performing a chant and hula.

A portrait of Pelehonuamea by artist, historian and author Herb Kane is displayed inside the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum.

Merrie - Monarch - Festival - Competition - Hilo

Before the annual Merrie Monarch Festival competition in Hilo, many halau visit Halemaumau crater to honor Pele. At left, members of Halau Ka Liko Pua O Kalaniakea throw lei and ti leaves into the crater after performing a chant and hula.

As threats from the latest Kilauea eruptions continue in Puna, many speak of the dramatic lava flows as the work of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanoes.

Native - Hawaiians - Hawaii - Residents - Activity

These Native Hawaiians and other Hawaii residents accept the volcanic activity that has consumed 36 structures and displaced hundreds of residents as demonstrations of Pele’s power and beauty. And there is no way to stop her.

Pelehonuamea, or Pele of the sacred earth, is also known as “ka wahine ai honua,” woman who devours the land. She is also called Madame Pele or Tutu Pele.

Tutu - Pele - Ancestor - Family - Aumakua

“I usually use Tutu Pele because she’s an ancestor to me and one of our family aumakua, or family guardian, so we have great respect for her,” said Lilikala Kame‘eleihiwa, a professor at the Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies on the University of Hawaii’s Manoa campus. “We have a personal relationship with Pele.”

The central figure of many chants, mele and hula, Pele is an akua or divine element, represented by volcanoes, lava and flowing fire. She is portrayed as an all-powerful force that dwells at Halemaumau, the pit crater inside the Kilauea summit...
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