Sex in the city: Urban Peregrine falcons are surprisingly faithful despite having more opportunities to cheat on each other

Mail Online | 7/15/2016 | Richard Gray for MailOnline
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If the comedy TV series Sex and the City is to be believed, urban life can descend into a mess of short-lived romances and promiscuity.

But it seems Carrie and her friends could have taken some relationship tips from feathered neighbours.

New - Research - Peregrine - Falcons - Cities

New research has shown that Peregrine falcons who live in cities are surprisingly loyal birds, forming long-lasting monogamous relationships.

The raptors, which are one of the fastest birds in the world, are usually found nesting on isolated cliffs in the countryside where such life-long bonds make sense.

Scientists - Birds - Areas - Proximity - Pairs

Scientists had expected as the birds move into urban areas and live in closer proximity to each other, there might be more cheating between mating pairs.

They found that almost all the birds they looked for the study remained faithful to each other.

Dr - John - Bates - Curator - Birds

Dr John Bates, associate curator of birds at the Field Museum, said: 'Peregrine falcons that now live in the Chicago region are living in very different conditions than you'd normally see for these birds, so we wondered if the falcons' mating habits had changed too.

'They're in much closer proximity to each other than they'd be in a more rural environment, and we thought they might be more promiscuous with more potential mates nearby.

'Each - Spring - Population - Migratory - Peregrines

'Each spring this population also has migratory Peregrines passing through on their way to all parts of Canada, so we didn't know what we were going to find, but it turns out that almost all of the mated pairs in the city remain monogamous through the years.'

During the 1960s in the US Peregrine falcons came perilously close to dying out due to the pesticide DDT.

Conservation - Efforts - Reintroductions

However, sustained conservation efforts and reintroductions have allowed...
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