New guidelines on preventing and treating 'equine strep throat' | 3/13/2018 | Staff
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Just as strep throat can run rampant in elementary schools, strangles, the "strep throat" of horses, caused by a different Streptococcus bacterium, Streptococcus equi sp equi, is highly contagious. Lymph nodes in the head and neck region become swollen and develop abscesses, resulting in nasal discharge and drainage from the throat. Though rarely fatal, strangles cases can range from mild to severe, and complications that impair eating and breathing can arise in some instances. Altogether, it's a disease that horse owners want to keep far from their stables.

Veterinarians have an important role to play not only in treating the disease, but also in ensuring that infected horses are kept away from other animals until they have fully recovered from the illness. This recovery is not always so clear cut, as many animals remain carriers of the bacteria even after they appear healthy.

Veterinarians - Owners - Recommendations - Strangles - Ashley

To assist veterinarians, and owners, in understanding the most up-to-date clinical recommendations when it comes to treating strangles, Ashley Boyle, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, took the lead in writing a new consensus statement, issued by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, on treating, controlling, and preventing strangles in horses.

"From a practical standpoint, the consensus statement serves to advise all veterinarians on what we recommend as a way to treat and deal with the disease," Boyle says. "I'm an internist who sees this disease as a primary care doctor at the horse farms as well as a field researcher. The authors of the consensus statement are a collection of experts in the field of Streptococcal diseases in horses including veterinary microbiologists, epidemiologists, and veterinarians who research this disease, as well as internists who encounter the disease frequently."

Boyle - Report - John - Timoney - Gluck

Boyle coauthored the report with John Timoney of the Gluck Equine Research Center...
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