Scientists develop superfast-charging, high-capacity potassium batteries

phys.org | 11/4/2019 | Staff
tanikakitanikaki (Posted by) Level 3
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Skoltech researchers in collaboration with scientists from the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS and the Ural Federal University have shown that high-capacity, high-power batteries can be made from organic materials without lithium or other rare elements. In addition, they demonstrated the impressive stability of cathode materials and recorded high energy density in fast charge/discharge potassium-based batteries. The results of their studies were published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A, the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters and Chemical Communications.

Lithium-ion batteries are widely used for energy storage, particularly in portable electronics. The demand for batteries is surging due to the rapid advancement of electric vehicles with high requirements for lithium. For example, Volvo intends to increase the share of electric vehicles to 50 percent of its overall sales by 2025, and Daimler announced its plans to give up internal combustion engines altogether, shifting the emphasis to electric vehicles.

Mass - Use - Lithium-ion - Batteries - Shortage

However, mass use of lithium-ion batteries exacerbates the acute shortage of resources needed for their production. Transition metals commonly used in cathodes, such as cobalt, nickel and manganese, are fairly rare, expensive and toxic. While the most of the less-common lithium is produced by a handful of countries, the global supply of lithium is too meager to replace all conventional automobiles with electric vehicles powered by lithium batteries. As estimated by the German Research Center for Energy Economics (FFE), the scarcity of lithium reserves may become a major issue in coming decades. Recently, scientists have suggested looking at alternatives such as sodium and potassium, which are similar to lithium in chemical properties.

Skoltech researchers led by Professor Pavel Troshin have made significant advances in the development of sodium and potassium batteries based on organic cathode materials. Their research findings were reported in three publications in top international scientific journals.

Paper - Presents

Their first paper presents...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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