The Reality of the Resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth

Juicy Ecumenism | 4/21/2019 | UM Voices
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Timothy W. Whitaker is a Retired United Methodist Church bishop who served the Florida Area.

UM Voices is a forum for different voices within the United Methodist Church on pressing issues of denominational concern. UM Voices contributors represent only themselves and not IRD/UMAction. This post was originally shared by Bishop Whitaker in an email. It is reprinted with his permission.

Greeting - Sunday - Service - United - Methodist

A suggested greeting for the Sunday Service in The United Methodist Book of Worship on Easter Day, the Resurrection of the Lord, is as follows: Christ is risen! Christ is risen indeed!

This greeting appears in somewhat different forms in modern Easter liturgies, such as the following: Christ is risen! The Lord is risen indeed! It may include an alleluia!, or the exclamation, Christ is risen indeed!, may be repeated following a doxology with the addition, Alleluia!

Antiquity - Acclamation - Liturgies - Pascha - Easter

I do not know the antiquity of this acclamation in liturgies for Pascha or Easter. However, the employment of the word indeed in these responsive verses is derived from Luke 24:34. According to BDAG, the Greek ontos is an adverb meaning really, certainly, in truth. Ontos in Luke 24:34 may be translated as indeed, as in the NRSV: “They were saying, ‘The Lord has risen indeed; and he has appeared to Simon’!” The NRSV follows the tradition of the KJV or Authorized Version of the Church of England in the seventeenth century. Even the New Jerusalem Bible, a version which is not in the tradition of the KJV, translates ontos as indeed. The Common English Bible uses really as does the paraphrase, The Message.

The English word indeed is an adverbial phrase consisting of two words. Originally the phrase was written as in deed, just as we continue today to write or say in very deed. Usage of this phrase can be traced back to the fourteenth century;...
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