'Origami' diagnostic device offers affordable malaria diagnoses

phys.org | 2/20/2019 | Staff
joseph76 (Posted by) Level 3
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Simple folded sheets of waxed paper could help bring affordable, reliable field tests for diseases such as malaria to remote parts of the developing world, scientists say.

In a new paper titled "Paper-based Microfluidics for Diagnosing Malaria in Low Resource Rural Environments," published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from universities in Scotland and China, working together with the Ministry of Health in Uganda, describe for the first time how origami-style folded paper, prepared with a printer and a hot plate, has helped detect malaria with 98% sensitivity in infected participants from two primary schools in Uganda.

Malaria - World - Causes - Illness - Death

Malaria is one of the world's leading causes of illness and death, affecting more than 219 million people in 90 countries around the globe, and killing 435,000 people in 2017 alone.

A significant issue for arresting and reversing the spread of the disease is diagnosing it in people who are infected but who do not display any symptoms, a problem which can only be addressed by widespread field tests. However, current tests, which rely on a process known as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), can only be carried out under laboratory conditions, making them unsuited for use in remote locations.

Team - Researchers - University - Glasgow - Partnership

The team, led by researchers from the University of Glasgow in partnership with Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the Ministry of Health in Uganda, have developed a new approach to diagnostics. It uses paper to prepare patient samples for a different type of detection process known as loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, which is more portable and better-suited for use in the field.

The origami platform uses a commercially-available printer to coat the paper in patterns made from water-resistant wax, which is then melted on a hotplate, bonding the wax to the paper.

Blood - Sample - Patient - Fingerprick

A blood sample taken from a patient via fingerprick is placed on...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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